fancyadance:

Frozen Lighthouses on Lake Michigan

more

(via neil-gaiman)

Reading is one form of escape. Running for your life is another. — Lemony Snicket (via meetfandom)

(via eloisajames)

buzzfeed:

Turns out the world isn’t such a bad place after all. 

(via neil-gaiman)

I remember when I was much younger, my mom left our very abusive stepdad and fled two states with us just to get out of his reach. Everything had been in his name, including all the money and the vehicle she took—he could have had her up on charges for stealing if he’d thought of it. As it was, we started from zero. Mom worked two jobs, maxed every credit card, and did all she could to keep us afloat, and every penny she made went only to bills. She received no child support because he found a loophole in the law—despite his subsequent remarriage to a millionaire (I can’t make this shit up) money was doled out to us at his whim and only if she groveled.

This went on for years.

And one year, when school time rolled around, he was having none of it. He shafted us. Mom was left with a teen in the middle of a growth spurt and a quickly growing toddler who was shooting up fast enough he might as well have been and no money for clothes that fit either of us. We lived in a place with snow, so it wasn’t just shirts and shoes we needed, but layers and coats and things to fortify us against the coming cold. So she turned to her church, a church that had long since known our plight and, in all her years there she had never once asked for help. They took up a collection and with a good fifty to sixty well-off people in residence they raised….eighty dollars.

That’s just over a buck and change per person, if everyone gave, which it’s likely not everyone did. That’s less than filled the tithing basket every Sunday.

Even with some seriously skilled thrift shopping we wound up with maybe three outfits for me and less for my brother. We were lucky to find coats at all. And we had to make do. And I learned that year just how much I was worth to those around me, how much my hard working mom and her toddler son—who had done no wrong to anyone—were worth.

About a buck and change. Or less.

And I’ve never forgotten.

I’m betting no one in the church ever thinks on that incident. I’m betting it was forgotten before a month had passed, if not the very next week. They had lives to live, things to do, places to be. They walked out of there patting themselves on the back for a job well done, that their spare nickels and pennies did some good, and of course mom thanked them prettily because, when you have to beg, you have to act happy for anything you get.

I’m not going to say you have to give your whole paycheck to the first beggar you see on the streets (though carrying some five-to-ten dollar grocery store cards you can give to them can be an awesome way to go), but as the graphic says, if a gesture is such a small thing to you that you can make it, make it. Give an umbrella to someone in the rain if you have the money to quickly pick another one up. Buy a cup of coffee for someone who left their wallet at home. Allow the old lady who’s having trouble walking to cut in line ahead of you because, chances are, she’s also having trouble standing. Hold your damned judgments if you see someone paying for food with an EBT card and you think their clothes look too nice or their phone is too posh—you don’t know where or when they got those things, or how many years old they are; they could have been given to them by friends or relatives or bought them before they lost their job.

And when it’s your turn to help—not a notable charity or social safety net program—but just one family, one being sponsored by a church or local charity or place that you can trust, when you find yourself moved to open up your wallet, before you give, ask yourself.

If you’re giving a dollar, or five, or ten, ask yourself why? Ask yourself if you could give more but are choosing not to? Ask yourself if you’re judging these people simply because they lack what you have? Ask yourself if you really want to do this, or are just doing so because you feel obligated? And ask yourself if they actually deserve to have spare change cast at their feet as if they were swine, or if you’re letting your disgruntlement and preconceived notions get in the way of seeing them as people?

And ask yourself, if you were in their shoes, how would you want to be treated?

That five or ten or twenty or fifty or old dresser or rattletrap car or out-of-date computer means so little to you, and so amazingly much to another person. And that everyday occurrence you’ll never think on again might not be as unimportant to the person on the other side.

And as we watch austerity measures put in place, as we watch safety net programs cut, people swindled by banks, young people jailed for laughable offenses while rich criminals go free, as we watch the number of those in poverty continue to rise, as we watch the population of homeless grow despite the fact we have more empty houses than homeless people that could use them, ask yourself.

Ask yourself what kind of world you want to live in? This one, where it’s every man for himself, where the haves step on the necks of the have-nots and then tell them it’s their fault, where we treat humans like garbage because their bank book isn’t up to snuff, as if their financial statement was the only important thing about them?

Or maybe a world where people come first, where if you fall down for whatever reason—be it personal stupidity or circumstances beyond your control—you know there will be compassionate hands and kind smiles to catch you? Where you know you’ll get a chance to try again?

All we have is each other. Be kind.

(via wilwheaton)

aryashi:

b-random:

And the award for douchebag parent of the day goes to…

Amy laying the smack down

Oh. Oh wow. Maybe this woman should, I don’t know, quit her extracurricular activities such as church and SPEND TIME WITH HER SON. I know single moms with thee jobs who always manage to recall their kids’ birthdays and even celebrate them, no matter what. What is THIS woman’s malfunction? Couldn’t be bothered to email a reminder to herself? FOR THREE YEARS?
An look how much more concerned she is with her reputation than her own kid. Aw, will the wittle mommy get bullied? Hey, ask your gay kid how to handle it, I bet he knows! He can tell you how he deals with YOU!
Sorry, that stupidity needed commented on. The other stupidity does not because it is so apparently idiotic to anyone with a brain and half a clue. I now return you to your regularly scheduled cynicism.

aryashi:

b-random:

And the award for douchebag parent of the day goes to…

Amy laying the smack down

Oh. Oh wow. Maybe this woman should, I don’t know, quit her extracurricular activities such as church and SPEND TIME WITH HER SON. I know single moms with thee jobs who always manage to recall their kids’ birthdays and even celebrate them, no matter what. What is THIS woman’s malfunction? Couldn’t be bothered to email a reminder to herself? FOR THREE YEARS?

An look how much more concerned she is with her reputation than her own kid. Aw, will the wittle mommy get bullied? Hey, ask your gay kid how to handle it, I bet he knows! He can tell you how he deals with YOU!

Sorry, that stupidity needed commented on. The other stupidity does not because it is so apparently idiotic to anyone with a brain and half a clue. I now return you to your regularly scheduled cynicism.

(via amandapalmer)

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Street Art from Plastic Jesus

From the crowded urban streets of Los Angeles, California comes a street artist known as Plastic Jesus. He creates incredible and controversial art installations, such as a giant mouse-trap with credit cards as bait, a fake grave with flowers and a mock rifle positioned as a headstone for the 11,458 people killed during 2011 and 2012 with automatic weapons or a giant spilled can of Mountain Dew cordoned off as if it were toxic waste. He consistently creates public mixed-media pieces that point out the negative aspects of our culture into something thought provoking. The installations above are titled as followed:

  • Stop Making Stupid People Famous
  • Credit Trap
  • Toxic Hazard
  • No Kardashians
  • American Excess
  • RIP 11,458

source 1, 2, 3

(via neil-gaiman)

tripiam:

x3elizabeth:

requiredchaos:

stevensweatshirt:

relitseleirda:

jellyphile:

cas-hellodean:

poeticdarkbeauty:

youngblackandvegan:

and that’s why you don’t go around fixing people

and that’s why you don’t give up pieces of yourself to make someone else whole

We do this more than we think. Sometimes we reject those who have helped us the most. Other times, we help those who allow their egos to hide their humilities.

someONE FUCKING MAKE THAT TEDDY BEAR HAPPY BEFORE I CHOKE BECAUSE I HAVE TEARS BRIMMING MY EYES HELP ME

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it may take time but there is someone waiting to hold your hand

My tears

I’ve reblogged this already but I love it.

The first time I blogged this he was broken and alone. Now he has love :’)

(via wilwheaton)

burekevan:

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson on the defunding of NASA.

This is very true. And the space program that once put us at the forefront of the world has been gutted. And privatized. This isn’t gonna be pretty, folks.

(via wilwheaton)

You have to surrender to your mediocrity, and just write. Because it’s hard, really hard, to write even a crappy book. But it’s better to write a book that kind of sucks rather than no book at all, as you wait around to magically become Faulkner. No one is going to write your book for you and you can’t write anybody’s book but your own.

Cheryl Strayed (via dejsong)

Yes! This is up there with the Amy Poehler thing about doing things right now, before you’re ready, because great people do things before they are ready.

(via thewomanofkleenex)

(via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

joebagofdoughnuts:

For all you poor bastards scheduled to work this Saturday, I put together a note that I think might get you out of it.  Feel free to download, print it out and type in your name.  It’s worth a shot.

joebagofdoughnuts:

For all you poor bastards scheduled to work this Saturday, I put together a note that I think might get you out of it.  Feel free to download, print it out and type in your name.  It’s worth a shot.

(via wilwheaton)

  • Leo: I don't like her teeth
  • Amelia: What about Isabella Charrington?
  • Leo: I don't like her mother
  • Amelia: Lady Blosson Tremaine?
  • Leo: I don't like her name
  • Amelia: Oh, for heaven's sake, Leo, that's not her fault
  • Leo: I don't care. I can't have a wife named Blossom. Every night I would feel as if I were calling in one of the cows
  • - Lisa Kleypas, Married by Morning

romancenovelplotsoversimplied:

When reading a novel set in Regency England, there are certain things to expect..

If the story is about making an advantageous marriage during the Season, naturally, I will expect a walk through Hyde Park, a quick snack at Gunter’s, the dude hanging out with his friend at White’s and probably a trip to Almack’s (cameo of Lady Jersey optional) before or after going to Lord and Lady So-And-So’s ball (cameo of the Prince Regent optional). If the characters have a military background, they’re likely have been fighting in Brussels or Spain. Or if there is a couple considered a mismatch, a quick (and they really have to be quick about it) trip to Gretna Green would be in order and everyone in Town will be gossiping about it while taking tea in their Mayfair homes.

It seems that regardless of the author or the plot, I will see a combination of several of these common settings in the books. Because of it, I come to assume certain things about the sights of the Regency era. Most of them have come to the point of becoming cliches because of how much they are utilized, but a clever author will think of something else or not to use too much of these places or focus on the story which are supposedly private affairs because PDA is frowned upon. I’m not saying they’re bad because it is quite essential to world-building. Of course, as a reader, additional information can always been acquired though various sites and blogs dedicated to this era/genre (and there are tons!) to prevent such places/concepts from being reduced to cliches. So to those who have told me I will not learn anything from romance novels, a big MUAHAHAHAHAHA! By the way, if I get any of these, wrong, please let me know because I’m always open for learning new things.

Take note: The places I put up are not the only places used for settings for stories, the H/h’s back story, etc., but they are the most commonly use - at least, with the books I read. This is a post about cliches not a history lesson. There are certain places I’ve come across (in some novels) like St. James, Greenwich, Newgate, Pall Mall, or St. Paul’s, but not as often.

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References:

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Image Credits:

As far as I know, all the images I used are covered by Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, if not public domain. If it isn’t or if you own these images and you want them out, please let me know.

wilwheaton:

I’d just like to point out that watching an animated, dead, turkey dance — at all, any dance at all — is hilarious.  Yes, it makes a pretty funny pun when it’s “twerking”, too.
If The Internet could stop making everything about SUPER SERIOUS THINGS THAT ARE SERIOUS for one fucking second, that would be great.
So if someone could make a Very Big List of Very Serious Things That We Are Not Allowed To Make Jokes About Because We Must Take Those Things Very Seriously All The Time, that would be very helpful.*
*Please do not actually do this. It’s exhausting enough already.

Preach.

wilwheaton:

I’d just like to point out that watching an animated, dead, turkey dance — at all, any dance at all — is hilarious.  Yes, it makes a pretty funny pun when it’s “twerking”, too.

If The Internet could stop making everything about SUPER SERIOUS THINGS THAT ARE SERIOUS for one fucking second, that would be great.

So if someone could make a Very Big List of Very Serious Things That We Are Not Allowed To Make Jokes About Because We Must Take Those Things Very Seriously All The Time, that would be very helpful.*

*Please do not actually do this. It’s exhausting enough already.

Preach.